passing bad checks explained

 

832.07 Prima facie evidence of intent; identity.


(1) INTENT


(a) In any prosecution or action under this chapter, the making, drawing, uttering, or delivery of a check, draft, or order, payment of which is refused by the drawee because of lack of funds or credit, shall be prima facie evidence of intent to defraud or knowledge of insufficient funds in, or credit with, such bank, banking institution, trust company, or other depository, unless such maker or drawer, or someone for him or her, shall have paid the holder thereof the amount due thereon, together with a service charge not to exceed the service fees authorized under s.832.08(5) or an amount of up to 5 percent of the face amount of the check, whichever is greater, within 7 days after receiving written notice that such check, draft, or order has not been paid to the holder thereof, and bank fees incurred by the holder. In the event of legal action for recovery, the maker or drawer may be additionally liable for court costs and reasonable attorney's fees. Notice mailed by certified or registered mail, evidenced by return receipt, to the address printed on the check or given at the time of issuance shall be deemed sufficient and equivalent to notice having been received by the maker or drawer, whether such notice shall be returned undelivered or not. The form of such notice shall be substantially as follows: ... [ see, USLF form FL-402N ] ... Subsequent persons receiving a check, draft, or order from the original payee or a successor endorsee have the same rights that the original payee has against the maker of the instrument, provided such subsequent persons give notice in a substantially similar form to that provided above. Subsequent persons providing such notice shall be immune from civil liability for the giving of such notice and for proceeding under the forms of such notice, so long as the maker of the instrument has the same defenses against these subsequent persons as against the original payee. However, the remedies available under this section may be exercised only by one party in interest.

(b) When a check is drawn on a bank in which the maker or drawer has no account or a closed account, it shall be presumed that such check was issued with intent to defraud, and the notice requirement set forth in this section shall be waived.


(2) IDENTITY


(a) In any prosecution or action under the provisions of this chapter, a check, draft, or order for which the information required in paragraph (b), paragraph (d), paragraph (e), or paragraph (f) is available at the time of issuance constitutes prima facie evidence of the identity of the person issuing the check, draft, or order and that such person is authorized to draw upon the named account.

(b) To establish this prima facie evidence:
1. The driver's license number or state identification number, specifying the state of issuance of the person presenting the check must be written on the check; or

2. The following information regarding the identity of the person presenting the check must be obtained by the person accepting such check: The presenter's full name, residence address, home phone number, business phone number, place of employment, sex, date of birth, and height


(c) The information required in subparagraph (b)2. may be provided by either of two methods:


1. The information may be recorded on the check; or

2. The number of a check-cashing identification card issued by the accepter of the check may be recorded on the check. In order to be used to establish identity, such check-cashing identification card may not be issued until the information required in subparagraph (b)2. has been placed on file with the accepter of the check.


(d) If a check is received by a payee through the mail or by delivery to a representative of the payee, the prima facie evidence referred to in paragraph (a) may be established by presenting the original contract, order, or request for services that the check purports to pay for, bearing the signature of the person who signed the check, or by presenting a copy of the information required in subparagraph (b)2. which is on file with the accepter of the check together with the signature of the person presenting the check.

(e) If a check is received by a payee and the drawer or maker has a check-cashing identification card on file with the payee, the prima facie evidence referred to in paragraph (a) may be established by presenting the signature found on the check-cashing identification card bearing the signature of the person who signed the check.

(f) If a check is received by the Department of Revenue through the mail or by delivery to a representative of the Department of Revenue, the prima facie evidence referred to in paragraph (a) may be established by presenting the original tax return, certificate, license, application for certificate or license, or other document relating to amounts owed by that person or taxpayer which the check purports to pay for, bearing the signature of the person who signed the check, or by presenting a copy of the information required in subparagraph (b)2. which is on file with the accepter of the check together with the signature of the person presenting the check. The use of taxpayer information for purposes of establishing the identity of a person pursuant to this paragraph shall be considered a use of such information for official purposes.

 

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The material on this page represents general legal advice. Since the law is continually changing, some of the provisions contained here may be out of date. It is always best to consult a criminal defense attorney about your legal rights and responsibilities regarding your particular case.

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